Survivors of childhood brain tumors are at an especially high risk for damage to the endocrine system. The endocrine system is comprised of glands and hormones that help to control specific functions of the body, such as metabolism, growth, puberty and reproduc-tion. Glands of the endocrine system include the pituitary,…
Michael X. Repka, M.D. Professor of OphthalmologyAssociate Professor of PediatricsJohns Hopkins University School of Medicine Childhood brain tumors present with visual symptoms about 50% of the time. Additional children will develop visual symptoms and or signs during and after treatment. Such signs may become permanent or may resolve. The input…
Neurotoxicity is a significant tumor-and treatment-related complication for a number of childhood cancer survivors. It is particularly relevant for children with brain tumors who require therapy specifically directed at the central nervous system. Despite its significance, relatively little is known about the etiology, diagnosis, prevention, or treatment of neurotoxicity. As…
Children and adolescents who have undergone treatment for brain tumors may be more likely to exhibit behavior problems than their peers. There have been relatively few formal studies of this issue, and behavior problems have often not been included in studies of neuropsychological outcome following treatment. Studies which have been…
Cerebellar mutism was first reported in 1979 by Hirsh after a posterior fossa tumor resection. In the past, cerebellar mutism was thought to be an uncommon problem. However, there have been increasing numbers of case reports and literature reviews that indicate that cerebellar mutism may be significantly more common than…

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